Posts Tagged ‘Bodyart’

Recreational Guide: The Arkansas River

October 31st, 2022

Arkansas River GeographyThe Arkansas River headwaters source is near Leadville,Guest Posting Colorado. The river technically ends in the Mississippi, which leads out to the ocean. The river drops 10,000 feet in the first 125 mile stretch. Within this stretch, the River carves through a large canyon now called the Royal Gorge. Because of the rapid drop of elevation, this stretch of river is popular for whitewater rafting and other river recreation. In total, the river drops 11,400 feet and covers a total of 161,000 square miles. The Arkansas River basin drains 24,904 square miles.From Colorado, the Arkansas River then runs through Kansas, Oklahoma and Arkansas, before meeting up with the Mississippi River. In total the river runs 1450 miles, which makes the Arkansas River the longest tributary in the Mississippi-Missouri water system.Carving out many canyons and gorges, perhaps one of the most well known is the Royal Gorge. With a width of 50 feet at its base and a few hundred feet at its top, and a depth of 1200 feet in places, the 10-mile-long canyon is a narrow, steep crevasse through the granite of Fremont Peak.The Arkansas River is now used as a main waterway for commerce, with the system being formerly called the McClellan-Kerr Arkansas River Navigation System or MKARNS. This specific stretch of the river is 445 miles. It takes a commercial towboat 5 days to travel the MKARNs distance. The commercial stretch of the river has multiple dam and lock systems allowing for greater control over the navigation efforts. The Arkansas River is used for waterway commerce, recreational activities (such as whitewater rafting) and wildlife preservation.Arkansas River HistoryThe Arkansas River was first discovered by Europeans before the Mississippi River in 1541. After Francisco Vasquez de Coronado forded the river, Hernando de Soto was on the lower river, when he later discovered the Mississippi. The Arkansas River had long been used by native Indians, who relied on the river for a source of food and shelter.The Arkansas River was claimed in 1682 by La Salle in the name of the king of France. A few years later, a fort was established on the banks of the mouth of the Arkansas. The river fort was called “poste Aux Arcansas” otherwise known today as the Arkansas Post. This became part of the Louisiana territory, which transferred to the hands of Spain after the Treaty of Paris in 1763.Perhaps the most important part in recent history for the Arkansas River came in 1787, when George Washington claimed that the navigable waters leading to the Mississippi and St. Lawrence.. shall be common highways and forever free…without any tax, impost or duty…” making the Arkansas River free for all future commerce and business. After that, many foreign countries began using the waterways to transport goods inland. In 1803 the United States purchased the Louisiana Territory, including the Arkansas River basin. The Arkansas River also became a very popular route for steamboats transporting people inland from the Mississippi. Many settlements had already been established along the banks and surrounding areas of the river.

Arkansas Owes Residents $100 Million

April 21st, 2022

Arkansas- home to a certain libidinous but pardoned former U.S. President, the Razorbacks, and the Crater of Diamonds State Park where professional and amateur prospectors can search for quartz, garnet, diamonds (the official state gem), amethyst and other precious gems. State Auditor Jim Woods, however, is urging both current and former residents of the Ozark state to search for a different kind of wealth. And they don’t even need to don prospecting gear while doing it.

Over $100 million in Arkansas unclaimed money and property is just waiting to be claimed by their long-lost owners who may number around 240,000. Even Hillary and Chelsea Clinton’s names have come-up on the list! “Ten percent of the people in Arkansas have unclaimed property here and all they have to do is come forward to claim it,” Jim Wood, State Auditor, says in a report done by the Arkansas News Bureau. Over the course of time, people lose track of their assets due to change of address, change in name (i.e. Marriage), death, or plain forgetfulness. Businesses also may be owed unclaimed money from abandoned assets brought about by lapses in their record keeping during the course of operation.

According to the NAUPA, (National Association of Unclaimed Property Administrators), “Unclaimed property (sometimes referred to as abandoned) refers to accounts in financial institutions and companies that have had no activity generated or contact with the owner for one year or a longer period. Common forms of unclaimed property include savings or checking accounts, stocks, uncashed dividends or payroll checks, refunds, traveler’s checks, trust distributions, unredeemed money orders or gift certificates (in some states), insurance payments or refunds and life insurance policies, annuities, certificates of deposit, customer overpayments, utility security deposits, mineral royalty payments, and contents of safe deposit boxes.”

The latter are the only tangible assets that the state holds for the owners, and puts them on public display (State Fairs, malls, etc.) every October and November in an effort to reunite them with their owners. No one knows what might come out of these abandoned safe deposit boxes: savings bonds, old coins, magazines commemorating the Razorbacks’ 1994 college basketball championship, an authentic Texas Rangers law-enforcement badge, even several 10-ounce bars of silver. If not claimed within a certain period, these items are put on sale on eBay and the proceeds put back into the state fund where they can still be claimed.

Annual lists of new owners of Arkansas unclaimed money and property are also published in newspapers and booths set-up at state fairs (over $18 million is added to the Arkansas unclaimed property fund ever year). Full lists of owners can be found online or calling by telephone.

As the figures show, these efforts by the State Auditor’s office is still inadequate and most state residents are still unaware of the presence of unclaimed money, Most people that do know think it’s too much of a hassle and don’t even bother to find-out how to access lost cash in Arkansas. It’s way simpler than you think. Get started on your own treasure hunt right now.